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Updated 1/7/16

2. His School and Early Years - 1948-1973, our research shows ...

A. Connecticut/Texas: 1948-1950

In June of 1948, George W. Bush and family moved from New Haven to Odessa, Texas. In 1949, the Bush family moved to California. In May of 1950, the Bush family moved back to Texas into a Midland home at 405 East Maple. Bush has five younger siblings: Pauline (Robin), Neil, John (Jeb), Marvin and Dorothy.

B. Texas: 1951-1961

Bush attended Sam Houston Elementary School. On Oct. 11, 1953, his younger sister Robin died of leukemia. Bush attended San Jacinto Junior High School in Midland, then Kinkaid School for the eighth and ninth grades when the family moved to Houston in 1959.

C. Massachusetts: 1961-1964

From September of 1961 to June of 1964, George W. Bush attended his father's alma mater Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, where he was the head cheerleader his senior year. After graduation, he worked on his father's failed Senate campaign.

D. Connecticut: 1964-1968

Bush returned to New Haven, where he was born, and attended Yale, his father and grandfather's alma mater, from the Fall of 1964 to 1968, and received his bachelor's degree in History from Yale University June 9, 1968. In a Yale University Commencement Address on May 21, 2001, Bush said, "And to the C students I say, you, too, can be President of the United States," in reference to his grades while attending Yale. In December of 1966, he was arrested for stealing a wreath in New Haven and charges were dropped, and on Nov. 18, 1967, he was detained for a short time by campus police for pulling down a goalpost with others during a visit to Princeton University.

E. Between Yale and Harvard: 1968-1973

On May 27, 1968, Bush enlisted and served as a fighter pilot in the Texas Air National Guard, his final day of orders was July 30, 1973, leaving to attend Harvard, and he received an Honorable Discharge Oct. 1, 1973, to the Air Force Reserve. Bush received an Honorable Discharge from the Air Force Reserve Nov. 21, 1974. He worked on three Republican Senate campaigns: 1968 for Edward J. Gurney in Florida; his father's second unsuccessful campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1970; and Winton M. "Red" Blount in Alabama in 1972. During this time he also worked as a management trainee in agribusiness at Stratford of Houston until the fall of 1971, and Professional United Leadership League, a youth mentor program, in 1973.

Source documentation to the above:

1. TexasMonthly.com, "The Son Rises," By Pamela Colloff, Jun. 1999 (Accessed 12-10-15)

2. WashingtonPost.com, "At Height of Vietnam, Bush Picks Guard," By George Lardner Jr. and Lois Romano, Jul. 28, 1999 (Accessed 12-10-15)

3. WashingtonPost.com, "Young Bush, a Political Natural, Revs Up," By Lois Romano and George Lardner Jr., Jul. 29, 1999 (Accessed 12-10-15)

4. NYTimes.com, "Earning A's in People Skills at Andover," Jun. 10, 2000 (Accessed 12-10-15)

5. NYT.com, "After Yale, Bush Ambled Amiably Into His Future," By Jo Thomas, Jul. 22, 2000 (Accessed 12-10-15)

6. Chicago Tribune, "Bush Bids Fond Farewell To Stomping Grounds On Way To White House," By V. Dion Haynes, Jan. 18, 2001 (Accessed 12-10-15)

7. Presidency.UCSB.edu, "Commencement Address at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut," May 21, 2001 (Accessed 12-10-15)

8. NYTimes.com, "President George W. Bush's Military Service: A Critical Analysis," by Gerald A. Lechliter, 2004 (Accessed 12-10-15)

9. CBSnews.com, "Bush Releases Military Records," By Lauren Johnston, Feb. 13, 2004 (Accessed 12-10-15)

10. CNN.com, "Bush releases his Vietnam-era military files," Feb. 14, 2004 (Accessed 12-10-15)

11. Salon.com, "Bush in the National Guard: A primer," By Eric Boehlert, Sep. 20, 2004 (Accessed 12-10-15)

12. LATimes.com, "Bush Records Belatedly Released," Oct. 6, 2004 (Accessed 12-10-15)

13. Kinkaid School Gala, Apr. 5, 2006 (Accessed 12-10-15)

14. MSNBC.com, "Soldier accused of lying about Vietnam Purple Hearts, Afghanistan attack," Jun. 7, 2012 (Accessed 12-10-15)

15. Politico.com, "George W. Bush suspended from Texas Air National Guard, Aug. 1, 1972," By Andrew Glass, Aug. 1, 2013 (Accessed 12-10-15)

16. CNN.com, "George W. Bush Fast Facts," Jul. 11, 2015 (Accessed 12-10-15)

17. Andover.edu, "No Longer Just For Future Presidents," May 12, 2005 (Accessed 12-10-15)

18. Andover.edu, "Notable Alumni: Short List" (Accessed 12-10-15)

19. Findlaw Link to Military Service Records of President George W. Bush (Accessed 12-10-15)

20. George W. Bush Childhood Home (Accessed 12-10-15)

21. George W. Bush Presidential Center (Accessed 12-10-15)

22. George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum (Accessed 12-10-15)

23. National Governors Association, "Texas Governor George W. Bush" (Accessed 12-10-15)

24. NotableBiographies.com, "George W. Bush Biography" (Accessed 12-10-15)

25. PBS.org, Frontline, "George W. Bush - Chronology" (Accessed 12-10-15)

26. Veterantributes.org, "George W. Bush" (Accessed 12-10-15)

27. Decision Points, By George W. Bush (Accessed online book 12-10-15)

28. The Family: The Real Story of the Bush Dynasty, By Kitty Kelley (Accessed online book 12-10-15)

29. George W. Bush: A Biography, By Clarke Rountre (Accessed online book 12-10-15)

30. George W. Bush and the Redemptive Dream: A Psychological Portrait, By Dan P. McAdams (Accessed online book 12-10-15)

31. In His Father's Shadow: The Transformations of George W. Bush, By Stanley A. Renshon (Accessed online book 12-10-15)

32. Test by Fire: The War Presidency of George W. Bush, By Robert Swansbrough (Accessed online book 12-10-15)